All posts by Mark Carson

The Minute Hand 1:03

The Minute Hand

Welcome to our ongoing series of short articles about watches which should only take a minute or two to read. We continue today with a brief discussion of watch crystals.


Watch Crystals


The crystal on a watch is the "glass" that covers the dial and hands.

There are basically 3 types of crystals used on watches these days. And really, only 2 of them are commonly used anymore.

  • Mineral Crystal - which is a fancy way of saying hardened glass. Even though hardened, it can be scratched by things like steel and brick so you should avoid scraping a mineral crystal against things. Advantages: low cost and better impact resistance than sapphire. Disadvantages: scratches somewhat easily and cannot be repaired (typically replaced if damaged).
  • Sapphire Crystals - man made, synthetic sapphire. They are chemically and structurally the same as  natural rubies and sapphires - all of which are corundum, an aluminium oxide. If a sapphire is red in color, it is a ruby. Otherwise any other color (including colorless as is used on watch crystals) is called a sapphire. So while we often think of sapphires as only being blue, this is not always the case.  The jewels in a watch movement are typically man-made rubies. So outside of their red color, they are the same material as a watch's transparent sapphire crystal over the dial and hands. Advantages: very hard (9 on the Mohs scale - where diamond is 10). Disadvantages: more costly than mineral crystal (glass) and it can be chipped or shattered more easily than hardened glass. One chipped, it can not be repaired (only replaced).
  • Plexiglass - an acrylic  plastic. A particular brand of plexiglass known as "Hesalite" has been used by Omega on their famous Speedmaster chronographs since they went to the moon with the Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin in 1969. While it is possible to buy a new Speedmaster today with a plexiglass crystal, most new Speedmasters have sapphire crystals. Plexiglass has been used for watch crystals since the 1950s and is highly impact resistant. You can beat on a piece of plexiglass with a hammer and while you will no doubt deeply scratch it, it is extremely tough and shatter resistant. Even with normal use (no hammering), scratches are common on plexiglass crystals. However, using abrasives many scratches can be polished/buffed out. Advantages: low cost compared to sapphire and virtually unbreakable. Disadvantages: scratches very easily and is not as transparent as mineral crystal or sapphire.

Crystals may be flat or domed (curved). If a crystal is only domed on one side, it will act as a magnifier and will distort your view of the dial and hands. A double domed (curved top and bottom) crystal avoids distortion while still having a pleasing domed appearance and feel.

Anti-reflective (A/R) coating are often (but not always) applied to a watch crystal to help minimize unwanted reflections that make it harder to read the time. If applied to just one side, it will be coated on the bottom (inside) surface where it will avoid being scratched. A doubled coated crystal has A/R coating on both the top and bottom surfaces of a crystal. This does a better job of eliminating reflections but the top coating may be scratched as the coasting is not nearly as hard as the sapphire crystal upon which it is usually applied.

"Flame Fusion" is a marketing term used by low end watch brand Invicta for some of their crystals. This appears to just be a thin layer of sapphire applied on top of a piece of mineral glass. It is generally considered to be a low cost, inferior product compared to a true sapphire crystal.

Another, historically interesting, crystal material was a piece of natural quartz which was used on the famous "Marie Antoinette" watch made by Abraham-Louis Breguet (the most famous watchmaker of all time). This is probably the most famous watch of all and was not even completed during the lifetimes of either Marie Antoinette or Breguet. To read more about this fascinating watch, pick up a copy of the book  "Marie Antoinette's Watch" by John Biggs -  Available on Amazon.


Times up! That's all for today. Stay tuned to the Hawaii Jewelers Association website for the next installment of "The Minute Hand" with your host, Mark Carson of Mark Carson / Individual Design watches.

The Minute Hand 1:02

The Minute Hand

Welcome to our ongoing series of short articles about watches which should only take a minute or two to read. We continue today with a brief discussion of water resistance.


Water Resistance


Units of measurement:

  • Meters or abbreviated as "M" - the metric system unit of measure which is about 3.28 feet.
  • Feet or abbreviated as "FT" - the English system unit of measure.
  • ATM - an abbreviation for "Atmospheres". Basically, 1 ATM = 10 M (or roughly 33.8 feet).

The correct term used for watches is "water resistance", not "water proof". The distinction is that at some amount of pressure, any watch will fail to keep water out, so no watch is totally "water proof". There is a liability driven reason to not use the term "water proof". So while watches may not be totally water proof, they are often water resistant to a specified depth.

As an aside, Rolex did produce a special Deepsea Challenge watch for James Cameron which went to the bottom of the ocean in his 2012 expedition. So you can argue that this special watch is "water proof" as there is no greater natural source of water pressure to be found on earth than the Challenger Deep in the Marianas Trench near Guam. Read more about this watch on aBlogtoWatch.com

The stated water resistance on a watch is the "nominal" or tested depth at which no water enters the watch. However, this is a static test value. Meaning, the watch is motionless in a pressure tank during the test. In actual use (swimming or snorkeling or scuba diving), the movement of your arm through the water will exert additional pressure. So do not assume that you can safely take your watch to the depth marked as you will no doubt move around underwater. So, here are the recommended activities for the most common water resistance values:

  • 30 Meters / 3 ATM / 100 Feet - suitable for an occasional splash, such as washing your hands or getting caught in the rain
  • 50 Meters / 5 ATM / 165 Feet - suitable for swimming
  • 100 Meters / 10 ATM / 330 Feet - suitable for swimming and snorkeling
  • 200 Meters / 20 ATM / 660 Feet - suitable for recreational scuba diving
  • 300 Meters / 30 ATM / 1000 Feet - suitable for most professional diving

Some guidelines about watches and water:

  • Never wind or pull out the crown when the watch is wet or underwater.
  • The maximum water resistance is usually engraved on the case back or may be printed on the dial of a watch.
  • If no water resistance is stated, assume the watch has NO water resistance and avoid getting it wet at all times.
  • Any watch that is regularly immersed in water should be inspected for water resistance ability every year.
  • Watch cases and bracelets should be rinsed thoroughly in fresh water after being in salt water.
  • If you notice condensation in your watch, send it to a qualified watchmaker immediately before rust or corrosion occur.
  • Avoid wearing your watch in saunas and hot tubs as the high temperatures can effect the watch’s gaskets.
  • Avoid bathing or showering with your watch as soap can reduce the surface tension of the gaskets which are designed to keep water out of your watch.

Times up! That's all for today. Stay tuned to the Hawaii Jewelers Association website for the next installment of "The Minute Hand" with your host, Mark Carson of Mark Carson / Individual Design watches.

Elephant Ivory in Hawaii

Elephant Ivory in Hawaii

Updated: 15 August 2015

Applicable laws:


Other Federal Documents:


International Treaty Basis for Currently Listed Endangered Species:


Quick Summary:

  • The Endangered Species act and the CITES treaty (which the U.S. is party to) are the basis for controlling the import, export and re-export of certain items including elephant ivory.
  • The Hawaii State Legislature passed Senate Bill 2647 and Governor Ige signed it into law on June 24th, 2016. Its enforcement date will be June 30, 2017. See the below summary for how this will impact jewelers and antique dealers in Hawaii.
  • Nothing in current Federal law prohibits the possession or intra-state sale of legally acquired ivory. Some States (including Hawaii) have, or are considering, enacting laws which may be more restrictive than Federal law.
  • The Endangered Species Act calls for the enforcement via the Secretary of the Interior, whose enforcement arm is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS or FWS).
  • Legally Acquired ivory is dentin from species listed by CITES which was:
    • Acquired or imported prior to the application regulations/listing
    • Or imported with a CITES permit (or a Federal permit)
  • Current Federal laws only allow interstate sales of post-ban ivory with accompanying paperwork (generally a CITES permit).
  • Executive Order 13648 does NOT state that ivory sales or possession are thereby illegal (this is a popular misconception). It instructs the USFWS to strictly enforce existing laws and calls for creating a national strategy.
  • The President has issued a National Strategy For Combating Wildlife Trafficking. It is a policy statement and does not have the force of law nor does it call for specific changes to current regulations.
  • The Directors Order 210 informs the USFWS as to enforcement of existing laws. It is not a law in and of itself. It only has applicability within the context of the USFWS’ mission to enforce the import/export/re-export provisions of CITES and the ESA.
  • Items of similar appearance to ivory are mentioned in the Endangered Species Act :

SIMILARITY OF APPEARANCE CASES.—The Secretary may, by regulation of commerce or taking, and to the extent he deems advisable, treat any species as an endangered species or threatened species even though it is not listed pursuant to section 4 of this Act if he finds that—

Such species so closely resembles in appearance, at the point in question, a species which has been listed pursuant to such section that enforcement personnel would have substantial difficulty in attempting to differentiate between the listed and unlisted species; the effect of this substantial difficulty is an additional threat to an endangered or threatened species; and such treatment of an unlisted species will substantially facilitate the enforcement and further the policy of this Act.

  • While it is legal to import trophy ivory (from authorized safaris) if done in accordance with CITES regulations, trophy ivory is always non-commercial and must remain so. Meaning, the buying and selling of post-ban trophy ivory is not legal even if the ivory was imported with a CITES permit.

Summary of Hawaii's Ivory Law:

  • The law: www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2016/bills/SB2647_HD2_.htm
  • Senate Bill 2647 passed the Hawaii Legislature and was signed into law on June 24, 2016.
  • The enforcement provisions of this new law start on June 30, 2017.
  • NOTE: The law does not distinguish between pre-ban (generally before 1975) and post-ban ivory. Unless an item is covered by a specific exemption (see below), all ivory items without CITES permits are assumed to be subject to this new law.
  • No person shall sell, offer to sell, purchase, trade, possess with intent to sell, or barter for any part or product from the following animal family, genus, or species: Elephant, Rhinoceros,Tiger, Great Apes, Hippopotamus, Lion, Pangolin, Cheetah, Jaguar or Leopard.
  • Unless otherwise authorized by federal law including the Marine Mammal Protection Act, 16 United States Code, chapter 31, no person shall sell, offer to sell, purchase, trade, possess with intent to sell, or barter for any part or product from the following marine family, genus, or species: Sea Turtle, Monk Seal, Narwhal, Whale or Walrus.
  • Unless otherwise authorized by federal law including the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (16 U.S.C. section 1851 et seq.) as amended, no person shall sell, offer to sell, purchase, trade, possess with intent to sell, or barter for any part or product from: Rays and Sharks insofar as the species is listed on appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species or as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act.
  • No person shall sell, offer to sell, purchase, trade, possess with intent to sell, or barter for any part or product from Mammoth, although the species is extinct.
  • NOTE: Mastodon is not mentioned in the Hawaii Law.
  • Antique Exemption: The covered animal species part or product is part of a bona fide antique; provided that the antique status of such a part or product is established by the owner or seller thereof with historical documentation showing the antique to be not less than one hundred years old and the covered animal species part or product is less than twenty per cent by volume of such an antique and the covered animal species part or product is a fixed component or components of a larger manufactured item and is not, in its current form, the primary source of value of the item.
  • Permitted Distribution: For a bona fide educational or scientific purpose or to or from a museum.
  • NOTE: The Permitted Distribution allows for "gifting" of covered items to museums or educational organizations (but not sale).
  • Inheritance Exemption: The distribution of the covered animal species part or product is to a legal beneficiary of an estate, trust, or other inheritance.
  • NOTE: Outside of the Inheritance Exemption, the law is unclear regarding gifting of covered items without compensation or exchange (sale, barter, etc.).
  • Gun, Knife and Musical Instrument Exemption: The covered animal species part or product is less than twenty per cent by volume of a gun, knife, or musical instrument, including without limitation string instruments and bows, wind and percussion instruments, and pianos, if the owner or seller provides historical documentation showing the item was manufactured no later than 1975 and the covered animal species part or product is a fixed component or components of a larger manufactured item and is not, in its current form, the primary source of value of the item.
  • Exempted when allowed by Federal Law: The sale, offer for sale, purchase, trade, possess with intent to sell or barter of the covered animal species part or product is expressly authorized by federal law or permit.
  • NOTE: The Exemption by Federal Law is primarily for items covered by CITES permits and not otherwise restricted by Federal Law.
  • Presumption of Intent to Sell: There is established a rebuttable presumption of possession with intent to sell a covered animal species part or product when the part or product is possessed by a retail or wholesale establishment or other forum engaged in the business of buying or selling similar items.
  • NOTE: The Presumption of Intent to Sell (Section 2, §183D.f) means that displaying a covered item in a retail store implies intent to sell. The "item not for sale" argument is presumed to be invalid.
  • Recommendation: Prior to June 30, 2017, sell off existing stock of legal ivory (and other covered items) which do not have CITES permits. Do not acquire new legal ivory items unless you are prepared to hold them as personal property and never sell them after June 29, 2017 unless you have a CITES permit.
  • This guide is for information purposes only. It has not been reviewed by an attorney and should not be used as the basis for legal guidance.

 


-- Mark L. Carson

The Minute Hand 1:01

The Minute Hand

Welcome to a new series of short articles about watches which should only take a minute or two to read. We will start with "Watches 101", truly the basics and build from there. There are exceptions to every "rule" but the following are generally correct and help to get the nomenclature and concepts across.


Watch Basics


Watch part names:

  • CROWN - the knob which is used to set the time. On a mechanical watch it's also used to wind up the main spring which powers the watch.
  • BEZEL - the ring around the dial. This may be fixed or it may rotate (diver's watches often have a rotating bezel with minute markings).
  • DIAL - the "face" of the watch which usually have markings to indicate hours and minutes/seconds.
  • HANDS - the analog pointers which reside above the dial. A "3 hand watch" has an hour hand, a minute hand and a seconds hand. A "2 hand watch" has no seconds hand.
  • LUGS - the "horns" on the case to which a strap or metal bracelet is usually attached.
  • MOVEMENT - the "engine" beneath the dial that contains the time regulation (quartz or mechanical) and gears which drive the hands.
  • STRAP - a non-metal band which attaches a watch to your wrist. Often made of leather or other flexible materials.
  • BRACELET - a metal band usually made with a number of links.
  • CRYSTAL - the transparent cover over the dials and hands. Usually made from Mineral Crystal (which is really hardened glass) or Sapphire (which is a clear, man-made sapphire crystal that is highly scratch resistant).

 

Types of watches:

  • QUARTZ - battery operated and time regulated via an quartz crystal, the second hand jumps from one second to the next. Generally less expensive than an mechanical watch of similar quality. Much more accurate than mechanical watches. Accuracy is usually within a few seconds per month. Quartz watches may have digital displays (such as LCD or even LEDs in older watches) or they may have analog hands.  Quartz watches with analog hands are sometimes referred to as "Mecha-Quartz", but they are still "quartz watches", not "mechanical watches" despite their hands and some gears.
  • MECHANICAL - powered by a main spring (no battery) and time regulated via a balance wheel and hair spring. Sweep second hand: the seconds hand makes 2.5 to 5 small movements per second which makes the hand appear to be sweeping in a more continuous motion compared the 1 second jumps on the typical quartz watch. Accuracy is usually to within a few seconds per day.

 

Types of mechanical watches:

  • MANUAL or also known as HAND WIND - the main spring which powers the watch is wound when you twist the crown clockwise. Most affordable hand wound watches need to be wound every day to keep good time and will stop if not wound after about 2 days.
  • AUTOMATIC or also known as SELF-WINDING - when worn, the main spring which powers the watch is wound by the gravity driven spinning of a weighted rotor (which is attached to the bottom of the movement). Automatic watches will be kept wound if worn daily, but otherwise, like a manual wind watch, will run out of power if not worn or wound for a day or two. Most automatic watches can also be wound by hand.

Times up! That's all for today. Stay tuned to the Hawaii Jewelers Association website for the next installment of "The Minute Hand" with your host, Mark Carson of Mark Carson / Individual Design watches.

Wailuku Girl with Brain Tumor Receives Special Gift

Wailuku Girl with Brain Tumor Receives Special Gift From Local Jeweler through Jewelers for Children and Make-A-Wish Hawaii

On Wednesday, May 18, 2016, Kayla’s wish granters invited her to go on an outing in Wailuku. Expecting nothing more than a typical day out with her family and wish granters, Kayla walked into Precision Goldsmiths to meet store owners Gary and Kathi who had a special surprise for her. Gary and Kathi explained their expertise of design and creating many of the fine jewelry pieces in the store. Within this conversation, they discovered her favorite color is blue so they collaborated to create a custom heart shaped pendant with a blue Sapphire in the center. This will be the first of many charms that can go on Kayla's gold link bracelet that the Mukai's are gifting Kayla.

Like the charm, every wish child is unique, and this wish is a true gem made extra special by the generosity of the Precision Goldsmiths, Hawaii Jewelers Association, Jewelers for Children, and their partnership to support the children of Make-A-Wish Hawaii.

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2016 Annual HJA Banquet & Design Contest

2016 Annual HJA Banquet & Design Contest

casino-night

Our 67th Annual Design Contest and Banquet was Saturday, April 30, 2016 at the Oahu Country Club.  Glitz Glam & Games and featured table top displays from our Associate Members, Vegas-style Casino Games including Craps, Roulette, and Black Jack, and concluded with the awarding of our 2016 Design Contest Winners. All attendees at our annual banquet also vote for their favorite piece in The People’s Choice Award.

See our Designer of the Year, all 2016 winners, all 33 entries, and photos taken throughout the evening by clicking here.

Do you have a jewelry design piece that you would like to submit for next year? Click here to learn more about the contest categories, rules, and how to register.

2016 Best of Honolulu Award

Best of Honolulu 2016 Plaque Red

Hawaii Jewelers Association Receives 2016 Best of Honolulu Award

Honolulu Award Program Honors the Achievement

HONOLULU April 14, 2016 -- Hawaii Jewelers Association has been selected for the 2016 Best of Honolulu Award in the Associations category by the Honolulu Award Program.

Each year, the Honolulu Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Honolulu area a great place to live, work and play.

About Honolulu Award Program

The Honolulu Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Honolulu area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

Waipahu “Wish Teen” Sosefina Receives a Wish

Waipahu “Wish Teen” Sosefina Receives a Wish from Make-A-Wish® Hawaii, Jewelers for Children, Hawaii Jewelers Association, Excellent Gems Hawaii, and Allegiant Air Pilots

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On Saturday, March 12, 2016, a 16-year-old Waipahu “wish teen” named Sosefina learned her wish to visit Six Flags in California was about to come true, but that wasn’t all. Diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus, Sosefina has a lot more to worry about than a typical teen should, and when the Jewelers for Children learned of her struggle, they wanted her to shine—with a special gift to last a lifetime.
On Saturday afternoon at Excellent Gems & Diamonds, Sosefina was greeted by Mabel Lau at her store in the Chinese Cultural Plaza, along with co-executive directors Bernard Nunies and Sophia Makaimoku-Young of Hawaii Jewelers Association, to teach Sosefina about what any 16-year-old loves to behold: precious stones. Little did Sosefina know, Mabel is not only a veteran of the jewelry industry of over 43 years; she is also the president of Hawaii Jewelers Association, the local affiliate of Jewelers for Children.

PC: Rayen Watanabe

Big Island Jewelers featured in the December issue of JCK

We are proud of our HJA member, Big Island Jewelers that were featured in the December issue of JCK

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When Gale Carpenter, owner of Hawaii’s Big Island Jewelers, asked his son, Chance, if he would be interested in joining the family business last year, the 27-year-old’s response was swift and decisive: “I’m all in.” Gale laughs, remembering the exchange. “I said, ‘What? You’re all in? Well, by God, let’s do this!’ I was totally surprised.”  READ MORE

Honolulu Jewelry Company Staff Donates Blood

2015 Honolulu Jewelry Company

The staff of Honolulu Jewelry Company s decided to spend their lunch break at The Hawaii blood bank on August 18, 2015 afternoon and donated a total of 5 pints to help save 15 lives!

Donated blood is a lifeline for many people needing long-term treatments, not just in emergencies. Your blood's main components: red cells, plasma and platelets are vital for many different uses. Help us save lives!